Tag Archives: Baker & Byrne

11,243 Wash and Wear Suits

Only in New York could you find a full-page newspaper ad for a men’s retail store showing a laundromat full of half-dressed men playing chess, and it took Steve Baker and Jack Byrne to dream it up as part of a campaign targeted at creating a new Barney’s after they joined Mogul Williams and Saylor [...]

Barneys’ Satyrs in the New York Times

Jack Byrne and his partner Steve Baker in Mogul Baker Byrne Weiss totally transformed the store’s advertising approach to upgrade Barney’s Men’s Store image with unorthodox and inspirational messages such as this full-page ad in The New York Times comprised of ten words and two Satyrs. The words? ” Seventh Avenue and Seventeenth Street. Where [...]

“Inproooo…In-corp-or-ated!”

This is the story of acquiring a major project from AT&T and The Bell System (pre-breakup) and the partnerships that were made and broken and the money that was made by all. Project launched AT&T machine-to-machine communications fore-running a hundreds-of-billion-dollar annual business. In 1962, after a decade of clearing my future path through the woods of six advertising [...]

How to Make Money Without Really Trying.

All right, Class, settle down. Here is the key question on your final exam in Advertising 101: What is the single most important contractual factor in assuring, from the agency’s point of view, that a satisfactory agency/client relationship will exist? No, it’s not the “duration of the contract”. It’s not the “stipulations” of responsibilities. It’s [...]

The Greatest Little Coupon in the World.

OK. Here’s a problem for you. It’s March 1970. Your new agency is two months old. You have left your partners at Griswold Eshleman Baker & Byrne, New York and Cleveland. Former partners (Charlie Farran, Jim Johnston, Sidney Matthew Weiss, Milton Guttenplan, Perry Brand, and Norman Cohen) were all behind you now. From the beginning [...]

It’s not Hanes until…

Everybody in the business of new business solicitation has a story to tell, often tragic, often comic, often both. But, my $100 bill is put aside for anyone who can tell one any wilder than the one I am about to narrate. Let me first set the stage. In April of 1962, a lanky Hungarian [...]